Long-lived species have improved proteostasis compared to phylogenetically-related shorter-lived species.

@article{Pride2015LonglivedSH,
  title={Long-lived species have improved proteostasis compared to phylogenetically-related shorter-lived species.},
  author={Harrison Pride and Zhen Yu and Bharath Sunchu and Jillian Mochnick and Alexander Coles and Yiqiang Zhang and Rochelle Buffenstein and Peter Hornsby and S N Austad and Viviana Isabel P{\'e}rez},
  journal={Biochemical and biophysical research communications},
  year={2015},
  volume={457 4},
  pages={669-75}
}
Our previous studies have shown that the liver from Naked Mole Rats (NMRs), a long-lived rodent, has increased proteasome activity and lower levels of protein ubiquitination compared to mice. This suggests that protein quality control might play a role in assuring species longevity. To determine whether enhanced proteostasis is a common mechanism in the evolution of other long-lived species, here we evaluated the major players in protein quality control including autophagy, proteasome activity… CONTINUE READING
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