Long-Term Feeding of Formulas High in Linolenic Acid and Marine Oil to Very Low Birth Weight Infants: Phospholipid Fatty Acids

@article{Carlson1991LongTermFO,
  title={Long-Term Feeding of Formulas High in Linolenic Acid and Marine Oil to Very Low Birth Weight Infants: Phospholipid Fatty Acids},
  author={Susan E. Carlson and Richard J. E. Cooke and Philip G. Rhodes and Jeanette Peeples and Susan H. Werkman and Elizabeth A. Tolley},
  journal={Pediatric Research},
  year={1991},
  volume={30},
  pages={404-412}
}
ABSTRACT: Red blood cell (RBC) phospholipids of infants fed human milk compared with formula have more arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA). The addition of low levels of marine oil to infant formula with 0.6 to 2.0% α-linolenic acid (LLA, 18:3n-3) prevented declines in DHA in formula-fed infants; however, the feeding trials were short (4 to 6 wk), LLA concentrations were low compared with current formulas (3.0 to 5.0% LLA), and the formulas were unstable. Trials with stable… CONTINUE READING

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We conclude that 1 ) AA and DHA decline in RBC and plasma phospholipids of preterm infants when only their n-6 and n-3 fatty acid precursors are consumed ; and 2 ) marine oil can maintain cord concentrations of RBC phosphatidylethanolamine DHA but further reduces AA .
DHA in RBC and plasma phosphatidylethanolamine ( PE ) declined during four weeks of feeding but not if marine oil provided DHA ( 0.2% or 0.4% ) and plasma phospholipid AA ( g/100 g ) decreased with time and marine oil feeding .
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