Long-Term Effects of the Rain Exposure Shortly after the Atomic Bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

@inproceedings{Sakata2014LongTermEO,
  title={Long-Term Effects of the Rain Exposure Shortly after the Atomic Bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki},
  author={Ritsu Sakata and Eric J Grant and Kyoji Furukawa and Munechika Misumi and Harry M Cullings and Kotaro Ozasa and Roy Shore},
  booktitle={Radiation Research},
  year={2014}
}
The “black rain” that fell after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been generally believed to contain radioactive materials. During 1949–1961 the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission conducted surveys that included a query about exposure to the rain that fell a short time after the bombings. This article presents the first report of those data in relation to possible adverse health outcomes. This study looked at Life Span Study subjects who were in either city at the time of bombing… 

Association of Acute Radiation Syndrome and Rain after the Bombings in Atomic Bomb Survivors

It is observed that the proportion of reported acute symptoms was slightly higher among those who reported rain exposure in some subgroups, however, suggestions that rain was the cause of these reported symptoms are not supported by analyses specific to the known areas of radioactive fallout.

Black rain in Hiroshima: a critique to the Life Span Study of A-bomb survivors, basis of the linear no-threshold model

  • S. Sutou
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
    Genes and Environment
  • 2020
It is concluded that not only A-bomb survivors but also not-in-the-city control subjects (NIC) were irradiated with residual radiation to a greater or lesser degree, which means that exposure doses in LSS were largely underestimated and that use of NIC as the negative control is faulty.

Epidemiological research on radiation-induced cancer in atomic bomb survivors

  • K. Ozasa
  • Medicine
    Journal of radiation research
  • 2016
The late effects of exposure to atomic bomb radiation on cancer occurrence have been evaluated by epidemiological studies on three cohorts: a cohort of atomic bomb survivors (Life Span Study; LSS),

OF DOSE RELATED FACTORS FOR THE EVALUATION OF EXPOSURES TO RESIDUAL RADIATION AT HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI

Groups of Japanese and American scientists, supported by international collaborators, have worked for many years to ensure the accuracy of the radiation dosimetry used in studies of health effects in

Cancer mortality in residents of the terrain-shielded area exposed to fallout from the Nagasaki atomic bombing

No increase in the risk of cancer mortality was observed, probably because the dose of the radiation exposure was low for residents in the terrain-shielded fallout areas of the Nagasaki atomic bomb, and also because the number of study subjects was small.

Title Cancer mortality in residents of the terrain-shielded area exposed to falloutfrom the Nagasaki atomic bombing

No increase in the risk of cancer mortality was observed, probably because the dose of the radiation exposure was low for residents in the terrain-shielded fallout areas of the Nagasaki atomic bomb, and also because the number of study subjects was small.

Low-dose radiation from A-bombs elongated lifespan and reduced cancer mortality relative to un-irradiated individuals

  • S. Sutou
  • Medicine
    Genes and Environment
  • 2018
The linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNT) has served as the basis of radiation regulation policy and if it were not for LNT, tremendous human, social, and economic losses would not have occurred in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident.

Title Autoradiographic analysis of internal plutonium radiation exposure inNagasaki atomic bomb victims

Background: Radiation doses received by Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors has been evaluated from data related only to external exposure because there was no reliable evidence for internal

Rediscovery of an old article reporting that the area around the epicenter in Hiroshima was heavily contaminated with residual radiation, indicating that exposure doses of A-bomb survivors were largely underestimated

  • S. Sutou
  • Medicine
    Journal of radiation research
  • 2017
The area around the epicenter in Hiroshima was heavily contaminated with residual radiation and non-hibakusha who entered Hiroshima soon after the blast suffered from severe acute radiation sickness, including burns, external injuries, fever, diarrhea, skin bleeding, sore throat and loss of hair.

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