Long-Term Collisional Evolution of Debris Disks

@article{Lhne2007LongTermCE,
  title={Long-Term Collisional Evolution of Debris Disks},
  author={Torsten L{\"o}hne and Alexander V. Krivov and Jens Rodmann},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2007},
  volume={673},
  pages={1123 - 1137}
}
IR surveys indicate that the dust content in debris disks gradually declines with stellar age. We simulated the long-term collisional depletion of debris disks around solar-type (G2 V) stars with our collisional code. The numerical results were supplemented by, and interpreted through, a new analytic model. General scaling rules for the disk evolution are suggested. The timescale of the collisional evolution is inversely proportional to the initial disk mass and scales with radial distance as… 

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