Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Soil Dust from Asia to the Tropical North Pacific: Temporal Variability

@article{Duce1980LongRangeAT,
  title={Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Soil Dust from Asia to the Tropical North Pacific: Temporal Variability},
  author={R. A. Duce and C. K. Unni and B. Ray and J. Prospero and J. T. Merrill},
  journal={Science},
  year={1980},
  volume={209},
  pages={1522 - 1524}
}
  • R. A. Duce, C. K. Unni, +2 authors J. T. Merrill
  • Published 1980
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Science
  • The concentration of airborne soil dust at Enewetak Atoll(11�N, 162�E) in April 1979 was 2.3 micrograms per cubic meter but decreased steadily to 0.02 microgram per cubic meter over the next 5 months. The spring dust is probably derived from China; its deposition rate (∼0.3 millimeter per 1000 years) suggests that it may be a significant contributor to the deep-sea sediments of the North Pacific. 

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