Long-Distance Dependencies Don't Have to Be Long: Simplifying through Provably (Approximately) Optimal Permutations

@inproceedings{Bommasani2019LongDistanceDD,
  title={Long-Distance Dependencies Don't Have to Be Long: Simplifying through Provably (Approximately) Optimal Permutations},
  author={Rishi Bommasani},
  booktitle={ACL},
  year={2019}
}
  • Rishi Bommasani
  • Published in ACL 2019
  • Computer Science
  • Neural models at the sentence level often operate on the constituent words/tokens in a way that encodes the inductive bias of processing the input in a similar fashion to how humans do. However, there is no guarantee that the standard ordering of words is computationally efficient or optimal. To help mitigate this, we consider a dependency parse as a proxy for the inter-word dependencies in a sentence and simplify the sentence with respect to combinatorial objectives imposed on the… CONTINUE READING

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