Long‐term survival and predictors of mortality in Alzheimer's disease and multi‐infarct dementia

@article{Mls1995LongtermSA,
  title={Long‐term survival and predictors of mortality in Alzheimer's disease and multi‐infarct dementia},
  author={Pekka K. M{\"o}ls{\"a} and Reijo J. Marttila and Urpo K. Rinne},
  journal={Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  year={1995},
  volume={91}
}
Long‐term survival was examined for 218 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 115 patients with multi‐infarct dementia (MID). The 14‐year survival rate for AD was 2.4% versus an expected rate of 16.6%, and for MID 1.7% versus 13.3% expected. MID showed a more malignant natural course than AD. Men carried a less favourable survival prognosis than women, both in AD and MID: the relative risk of dying for women was half that for men in both diseases. In MID, advanced disability indicated a… 
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