Long‐term natal site‐fidelity by immature lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) at a subtropical island

@article{Chapman2009LongtermNS,
  title={Long‐term natal site‐fidelity by immature lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) at a subtropical island},
  author={D. Chapman and E. Babcock and S. Gruber and J. DiBattista and B. Franks and S. Kessel and T. Guttridge and E. K. Pikitch and K. Feldheim},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2009},
  volume={18}
}
Although many sharks begin their life confined in nursery habitats, it is unknown how rapidly they disperse away from their natal area once they leave the nursery. We examine this issue in immature lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) from the time they leave the nursery (∼ age 3) at a subtropical island (Bimini, Bahamas), through to the onset of sexual maturity (∼ age 12). From 1995 to 2007 we tagged and genotyped a large fraction of the nursery‐bound sharks at this location (0–3 years of age… Expand
Age and growth of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) at an insular nursery in the southern Caribbean
TLDR
Growth rate increased with age during the first 4 years of life for lemon sharks at Los Roques, while they occupied the nursery area, and comparison of growth rates among geographically separate nursery areas showed no obvious relationships between growth rate and latitude or temperature. Expand
The spatiotemporal dynamics of habitat use by blacktip (Carcharhinus limbatus) and lemon (Negaprion brevirostris) sharks in nurseries of St. John, United States Virgin Islands
TLDR
The results of this study indicate that Fish Bay and Coral Bay are nursery areas that warrant designation as essential fish habitat and exemplify the need for additional focused management measures. Expand
Two decades of genetic profiling yields first evidence of natal philopatry and long‐term fidelity to parturition sites in sharks
TLDR
Genetic profiling of lemon sharks from 20 consecutive cohorts at Bimini, Bahamas, showed that certain females faithfully gave birth at this site for nearly two decades, providing the first direct evidence of natal philopatry in the chondrichthyans. Expand
Site fidelity of migratory bonnethead sharks Sphyrna tiburo (L. 1758) to specific estuaries in South Carolina, USA
TLDR
It is hypothesized that bonnetheads are using South Carolina's estuaries as summer feeding grounds due to the relatively high abundance of blue crabs, including ovigerous females during spring and summer months, and the location of these ephemeral yet predictable feeding areas is socially transmitted to relatively young, naive sharks by experienced, older individuals. Expand
Size frequency, dispersal distances and variable growth rates of young sharks in a multi-species aggregation.
TLDR
High abundances of both species coupled with long-term and repeated recaptures are indicative of a habitat where juveniles can reside for their first years of life, however, large variability in annual growth rates in both species may suggest high intra and interspecific competition induced by a possibly resource limited, isolated habitat. Expand
Reproductive philopatry in a coastal shark drives age-related population structure
TLDR
The results highlight the need to target young-of-the-year sharks when investigating reproductive philopatry to exclude roaming individuals that obscure size-related signals of genetic differentiation and recommend protected areas, or time-area closures, prohibiting exploitation in the nursery areas during pupping season. Expand
Regional-Scale Migrations and Habitat Use of Juvenile Lemon Sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) in the US South Atlantic
TLDR
The findings validate the existing multi-state management strategies now in place and affirm the value of collaborative passive arrays for resolving seasonal movements and habitat preferences of migratory coastal shark species not easily studied with other tagging techniques. Expand
Direct genetic evidence for reproductive philopatry and associated fine‐scale migrations in female blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in French Polynesia
TLDR
The analysis of breeding patterns of female blacktip reef sharks in Moorea revealed that females migrated to the same nursery for every birthing event, indicating an overall reduced population size, restricted movements and dispersal, or specific mating behaviour. Expand
What makes a house a home: Examining the relationship between growth and predation risk in a coastal elasmobranch, the lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris)
TLDR
The data suggest that juvenile lemon shark populations exhibit frequency-dependent habitat selection with respect to prey availability, and results indicate that of the variables studied, food availability primarily determined habitat quality in nursery grounds, with a less important role for predation pressure. Expand
Long-Term Acoustic Monitoring Reveals Site Fidelity, Reproductive Migrations, and Sex Specific Differences in Habitat Use and Migratory Timing in a Large Coastal Shark (Negaprion acutidens)
Knowledge of the movement patterns of the lemon shark Negaprion acutidens is poor in contrast to the allopatric N. brevirostis. Using acoustic telemetry, we investigated daily (diel and tidal) andExpand
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