Long‐term management of vulval lichen sclerosus in adult women

@article{Bradford2010LongtermMO,
  title={Long‐term management of vulval lichen sclerosus in adult women},
  author={Jennifer Bradford and Gayle Fischer},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={50}
}
  • J. Bradford, G. Fischer
  • Published 1 April 2010
  • Medicine
  • Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Background:  Adult vulval lichen sclerosus (VLS) is usually a lifelong disease with an estimated remission rate after treatment of only 16% [Arch Dermatol 2004; 140 (6): 709]. Although superpotent topical corticosteroid (TCS) is the validated gold standard treatment to induce remission, little data are available on how remission should be maintained. 

Paper Mentions

Observational Clinical Trial
The study aims to validate a vulvar scarring grading scale for lichen sclerosus (LS).  
ConditionsLichen Sclerosus, Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus
InterventionOther
Prepubertal‐Onset Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus: The Importance of Maintenance Therapy in Long‐Term Outcomes
TLDR
Outcomes of long‐term treatment using individualized regimens with target outcome of complete objective normality in childhood vulvar lichen sclerosus are reviewed. Expand
Vulval lichen sclerosus: An Australasian management consensus
TLDR
This study has identified a set of management statements for VLS that may be useful in clinical practice in the Australasian population. Expand
Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus: Diagnosis and Management
TLDR
VLS is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition of the vulva that most commonly affects postmenopausal women and may result in irreversible destruction of the genitalia and can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Expand
Diagnosis and Treatment of Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus: An Update for Dermatologists
TLDR
Lichen sclerosus has been considered a difficult to manage condition; however, both serious complications can potentially be prevented with early intervention with topical corticosteroid, suggesting that the course of the disease can be treatment modified. Expand
Long-term Management of Adult Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus: A Prospective Cohort Study of 507 Women.
TLDR
This prospective, single-center, longitudinal cohort study of adult patients with VLS suggests that individualized preventive TCS regimens that achieve objective normality of skin color and texture and are used by compliant patients who attend regular long-term follow-up visits may modify the course of the disease. Expand
Vulvar lichen sclerosus: Description of 5 cases successfully treated with the 2,940nm Erbium-YAG laser
Lichen sclerosus is a chronic dermatosis, usually anogenital and mainly affecting pos-menopausal women. The use of topical corticosteroids is the mainstay of medical treatment. Other treatments areExpand
Extensive anogenital lichen sclerosus with vaginal stenosis: A case report
TLDR
A case of a woman affected by extensive anogenital lichen sclerosus complicated with vaginal stenosis is described, usually affecting skin, particularly genital region. Expand
Mometasone fuoroate 0.1% ointment in the treatment of vulvar lichen sclerosus: a study of efficacy and safety on a large cohort of patients
Guidelines identify a 3‐month topical application of an ultra‐potent corticosteroid ointment as the mainstay of medical treatment for vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS). However, there are no trialsExpand
Lichen sclerosus of the vulva
  • F. Guidozzi
  • Medicine
  • Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society
  • 2021
TLDR
Lichen sclerosus of the vulva (LSV) is seen frequently enough to warrant knowing how to diagnose it and institute appropriate treatment strategies, but a number of alternative treatment options have been mooted, especially if the disease is resistant to topical corticosteroids. Expand
Treatment of genital lichen sclerosus in women - review
TLDR
This review aims to analyze available literature on the treatment of this disease entity and take into consideration Genetic, infectious, hormonal factors and autoimmune mechanisms are taken into consideration. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Management of anogenital lichen sclerosus
Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a skin condition that affects genital and extra genital epithelia in both males and females of all ages and it may occur in association with other autoimmune disease.Expand
Long-term control of vulval lichen sclerosus after treatment with a potent topical steroid cream.
TLDR
Review of 12 women up to 39 months following a course of super potent topical steroids shows that subsequent control of disease activity and symptoms is much easier than before therapy, with most patients requiring only small amounts of moderate potency topical steroid. Expand
Guidelines for the follow-up of women with vulvar lichen sclerosus in specialist clinics.
It is recommended that women with vulvar lichen sclerosus be followed in specialist clinics where difficulty exists with symptom control or where there is clinical evidence of localized skinExpand
Lichen sclerosus of the vulva. Long-term steroid maintenance therapy.
TLDR
The graduated topical steroid regimen has a high response rate and takes a relatively short time to achieve, justifying the use of graduated topical steroids for this condition. Expand
Vulvar lichen sclerosus: effect of long-term topical application of a potent steroid on the course of the disease.
TLDR
Treatment with a potent steroid cream can improve but does not cure VLS in women older than 70 years, probably because of a long disease evolution. Expand
Guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus
TLDR
These guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus present evidence‐based guidance for treatment, with identification of the strength of evidence available at the time of preparation, and a brief overview of epidemiological aspects, diagnosis and investigation. Expand
Does treatment of vulvar lichen sclerosus influence its prognosis?
TLDR
Topical ultrapotent steroid is an effective treatment for vulvar lichen sclerosus, giving relief of symptoms in most and completely reversing the skin changes in approximately one fifth of patients. Expand
Lichen sclerosus: a review and practical approach
TLDR
Lichen sclerosus is associated with a 4–6% risk of squamous cell carcinoma, making long‐term follow‐up essential in these patients, and only potent or ultra‐potent corticosteroids remain as the treatment of choice. Expand
The treatment of vulval lichen sclerosus with a very potent topical steroid (clobetasol Propionate 0.05%) cream
TLDR
The clinical and histological response to 12 weeks of treatment with a very potent topical fluorinated steroid was studied in patients with vulval lichen sclerosus and showed a significant reduction in the characteristic features of LS. Expand
Squamous cell carcinoma arising in vulval lichen sclerosus: a longitudinal cohort study
TLDR
Data support the view that LS is a precursor of SCC, although characterized by slight tendency to evolve to carcinoma, and medical treatment of LS, although useful in the control of severity of disease, did not seem to be able to prevent the evolution to malignancy. Expand
...
1
2
3
...