Long‐term breast cancer survivors: confidentiality, disclosure, effects on work and insurance

@article{Stewart2001LongtermBC,
  title={Long‐term breast cancer survivors: confidentiality, disclosure, effects on work and insurance},
  author={Donna Eileen Stewart and Angela M. Cheung and S Duff and F Wong and Maureen Mcquestion and Thomas Cheng and Lisa P Purdy and Terry Bunston},
  journal={Psycho‐Oncology},
  year={2001},
  volume={10}
}
As more women are diagnosed with breast cancer, more will survive the illness from a few years to a lifetime. This study sought to determine the experience of Canadian breast cancer survivors with respect to the impact of cancer on confidentiality, work and insurance. 

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