Long‐term Psychiatric Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of the Literature

@article{Hesdorffer2009LongtermPO,
  title={Long‐term Psychiatric Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of the Literature},
  author={Dale C. Hesdorffer and Scott L. Rauch and Carol A. Tamminga},
  journal={Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation},
  year={2009},
  volume={24},
  pages={452–459}
}
ObjectiveTo determine the relationship between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long-term psychiatric health outcomes, occurring 6 months or more after TBI. ParticipantsNot applicable. DesignSystematic review of the published, peer-reviewed literature. Primary MeasuresNot applicable. ResultsWe identified studies that examined psychiatric disorders following TBI. There was sufficient evidence of an association between TBI and depression and similarly compelling evidence of an association between… 
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