Long‐Term Cold Acclimation Leads to High Q10 Effects on Oxygen Consumption of Loggerhead Sea Turtles Caretta caretta

@article{Hochscheid2004LongTermCA,
  title={Long‐Term Cold Acclimation Leads to High Q10 Effects on Oxygen Consumption of Loggerhead Sea Turtles Caretta caretta},
  author={S. Hochscheid and F. Bentivegna and J. Speakman},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2004},
  volume={77},
  pages={209 - 222}
}
We monitored oxygen consumption (V̇o2, body temperatures (Tb), submersion intervals, and circadian rhythms of V̇o2 in nine loggerhead turtles during a 6‐mo period. The turtles originated from the Tyrhennian Sea, South Italy (40°51′N, 14°17′E) and were kept in indoor tanks at constant photoperiod while being subject to the seasonal decline in water temperature (Tw = 27.1° to 15.3°C). From summer to winter, all turtles underwent profound reductions in V̇o2 (Q10 = 5.4). Simultaneously, their… Expand
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