Long‐Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment for Facial Telangiectasias and Erythema: Evaluation of a Single Purpuric Pass versus Multiple Subpurpuric Passes

@article{Iyer2005LongPulsedDL,
  title={Long‐Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment for Facial Telangiectasias and Erythema: Evaluation of a Single Purpuric Pass versus Multiple Subpurpuric Passes},
  author={Shilesh Iyer and Richard E. Fitzpatrick},
  journal={Dermatologic Surgery},
  year={2005},
  volume={31},
  pages={898–903}
}
Background and Objective Subpurpuric treatments with the pulsed dye laser can be effective for treatment of vascular lesions, although less so than when purpuric fluences are used. Increased efficacy may be achieved by performing multiple passes at the time of treatment. We performed a split-face bilateral paired comparison of multiple low-fluence subpurpuric passes compared with a single high-fluence purpuric pass in the treatment of facial telangiectasias. Materials and Methods Nine patients… Expand
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