Logical reasoning and domain specificity

@article{Davies1995LogicalRA,
  title={Logical reasoning and domain specificity},
  author={P. Davies and J. Fetzer and Thomas R. Foster},
  journal={Biology and Philosophy},
  year={1995},
  volume={10},
  pages={1-37}
}
  • P. Davies, J. Fetzer, Thomas R. Foster
  • Published 1995
  • Biology
  • Biology and Philosophy
  • The social exchange theory of reasoning, which is championed by Leda Cosmides and John Tooby, falls under the general rubric “evolutionary psychology” and asserts that human reasoning is governed by content-dependent, domain-specific, evolutionarily-derived algorithms. According to Cosmides and Tooby, the presumptive existence of what they call “cheater-detection” algorithms disconfirms the claim that we reason via general-purpose mechanisms or via inductively acquired principles. We contend… CONTINUE READING
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