Logical depth and physical complexity

@inproceedings{Bennett1988LogicalDA,
  title={Logical depth and physical complexity},
  author={Charles H. Bennett},
  year={1988}
}
Some mathematical and natural objects (a random sequence, a sequence of zeros, a perfect crystal, a gas) are intuitively trivial, while others (e.g. the human body, the digits of π) contain internal evidence of a nontrivial causal history. We formalize this distinction by defining an object’s “logical depth” as the time required by a standard universal Turing machine to generate it from an input that is algorithmically random (i.e. Martin-Lof random). This definition of depth is shown to be… Expand
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