• Corpus ID: 108624889

Location-Sharing Technologies: Privacy Risks and Controls

@article{Tsai2009LocationSharingTP,
  title={Location-Sharing Technologies: Privacy Risks and Controls},
  author={Janice Y. Tsai and Patrick Gage Kelley and Lorrie Faith Cranor and Norman M. Sadeh},
  journal={Innovation Law \& Policy eJournal},
  year={2009}
}
Due to the ability of cell phone providers to use cell phone towers to pinpoint users’ locations, federal E911 requirements, the increasing popularity of GPS-capabilities in cellular phones, and the rise of cellular phones for Internet use, a plethora of new applications have been developed that share users’ real-time location information online [26]. This paper evaluates users’ risk and benefit perceptions related to the use of these technologies and the privacy controls of existing location… 
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