Local sleep and learning

@article{Huber2004LocalSA,
  title={Local sleep and learning},
  author={Reto Huber and Maria Felice Ghilardi and Marcello Massimini and Giulio Tononi},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={430},
  pages={78-81}
}
Human sleep is a global state whose functions remain unclear. During much of sleep, cortical neurons undergo slow oscillations in membrane potential, which appear in electroencephalograms as slow wave activity (SWA) of <4 Hz. The amount of SWA is homeostatically regulated, increasing after wakefulness and returning to baseline during sleep. It has been suggested that SWA homeostasis may reflect synaptic changes underlying a cellular need for sleep. If this were so, inducing local synaptic… 
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