Local shopping as a strategy for reducing automobile travel

@article{Handy2001LocalSA,
  title={Local shopping as a strategy for reducing automobile travel},
  author={Susan L. Handy and Kelly J Clifton},
  journal={Transportation},
  year={2001},
  volume={28},
  pages={317-346}
}
Suburban development in the US is widely criticized for its contribution to automobile dependence and its consequences. Not surprisingly, then, a return to more urban-style development, where potential destinations are closer to home, is often put forth as a strategy for reducing automobile dependence. This paper evaluates the possibility that providing local shopping opportunities will help to reduce automobile dependence by exploring how residents of existing neighborhoods make use of the… 

Downtown, strip centers, and big-box stores: Mode choice by shopping destination type in Davis, California

Growing concerns about climate change and traffic congestion are motivating policymakers to find ways to encourage sustainable travel options. In the United States, where 88 percent of shopping trips

HOW LOCAL IS MAIN STREET ? AN ANALYSIS OF NONWORK RELATED TRIPS TO FOUR COMMERCIAL STREETS

With increasing concern about global climate change and sustainable development, local shopping in pedestrian friendly environments has been promoted as a strategy to reduce travel distances and

Perceptions of Walking Distance to Neighborhood Retail and Other Public Services

As concerns such as growing traffic congestion continue to mount in communities nationwide, there is increasing attention devoted to the role of infrastructure investments in affecting travel

How Local Is Main Street? Analysis of Non-Work-Related Trips to Four Commercial Streets in Montréal

With increasing concern about global climate change and sustainable development, local shopping in pedestrian friendly environments has been promoted as a strategy to reduce travel distances and

Examining Consumer Behavior and Travel Choices

This study represents a first attempt to answer a few of the questions that have arisen concerning multimodal transportation investments and the impacts of mode shifts on the business community. This

Food Shopping in the Urban Environment: Parking Supply, Destination Choice, and Mode Choice

This research contributes to the well studied influence of urban form on travel behavior with an examination of the specific impact of surface parking lots at supermarkets. Past studies have

Accessibility, Travel Behavior, and New Urbanism

TLDR
The findings of the study suggest that aspects of the built environment, as well as attitudinal factors, influence travel behavior–in particular, walking behavior–although further research needs to be conducted in this area to make informed policy decisions pertaining to transportation and land use.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 13 REFERENCES

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LAND USE POLICIES AS A STRATEGY FOR REDUCING AUTOMOBILE DEPENDENCE: A STUDY OF AUSTIN NEIGHBORHOODS

The work described in this report represents an effort to better understand the link between urban form and travel behavior and to evaluate the potential effectiveness of land use policies as a

REDUCING THE IMPACT OF THE CAR: A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH: TRAVELSMART ADELAIDE

The technique of travel blending - an individual action approach to the reduction of the impact of the car - has now been trialled in a number of cities around the world over the past two to three

The demand for shopping travel: a theoretical and empirical study

The paper is concerned with the development of a basic methodology for the future study of shopping. It is demonstrated how existing methodology fails to allow for some of the most important

Chain Image and Store-Choice Modeling: The Effects of Income and Race

Addressed in this paper is the lack of understanding of the extent to which the image of a store can affect store selection and of the extent to which this image varies across market segments. The

Why Do People Shop

T HE field of consumer behavior has experienced a dynamic period of growth over the past 10 years. It is frequently overlooked, however, that this broad area consists of three distinct activities:

The Distinction between Convenience Goods, Shopping Goods, and Specialty Goods

The essence of the distinction between convenience goods and shopping goods may lie in the gain resulting from price and quality comparisons relative to the searching costs. For convenience goods

EVALUATING NEIGHBORHOOD ACCESSIBILITY: ISSUES AND METHODS USING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Several different trends in the 1990s have led to increased efforts to improve the alternatives to driving. In response, planning agencies have been taking a new look at both transportation and land

At celebration , reasons to celebrate

  • The New York Times
  • 1999