Living with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Children's Experiences of Participating in Home Exercise Programmes

@article{DeMonte2009LivingWJ,
  title={Living with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Children's Experiences of Participating in Home Exercise Programmes},
  author={Rachel De Monte and Sylvia A. Rodger and Fiona Jones and Sarah Broderick},
  journal={The British Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  year={2009},
  volume={72},
  pages={357 - 365}
}
Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is used to describe the different subgroups of arthritis in children. JIA is the most common chronic rheumatic condition in children. The long-term consequences are not limited to physical disabilities but also have an impact on the child's social, emotional and cognitive development. Home exercise programmes are a major part of the complex treatment regimen for JIA. Research to date is limited in providing insights into children's perspectives about JIA… Expand

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