Living in a “stethoscope”: burrow-acoustics promote auditory specializations in subterranean rodents

@article{Lange2006LivingIA,
  title={Living in a “stethoscope”: burrow-acoustics promote auditory specializations in subterranean rodents},
  author={Simone Lange and H. Burda and R. Wegner and P. Dammann and S. Begall and M. Kawalika},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2006},
  volume={94},
  pages={134-138}
}
Subterranean mammals rely to a great extent on audition for communication and to be alerted to danger. The only hitherto published report on burrow acoustics revealed that in tunnels of blind mole-rats (Spalax ehrenbergi), airborne sounds of 440 Hz propagated best whereas lower and higher frequencies were effectively attenuated. Morpho-functional analyses classify the ear of subterranean mammals as a low-sensitivity and low-frequency device. Concordantly, hearing is characterized by low… Expand
Audiograms of three subterranean rodent species (genus Fukomys) determined by auditory brainstem responses reveal extremely poor high-frequency cut-offs
TLDR
Auditory brainstem recordings and audiograms of three mole-rat species reveal a highly restricted hearing range, similar to that of other subterranean mammals. Expand
Vibrational communication of subterranean rodents
  • 2012
In subterranean ecotope, where absence of light and ventilation limits visual and olfactory communication, options for long-range communication are restricted. Vocalization is thus one of the fewExpand
Three Decades of Subterranean Acoustic Communication Studies
TLDR
The ecological and evolutionary conditions that influence the characteristics of vibrational communication in subterranean rodents are reviewed and the similarities and differences in the vocal repertoires of social and solitary groups are analyzed. Expand
VOCALISATIONS OF A NORTH AMERICAN SUBTERRANEAN RODENT GEOMYS BREVICEPS
ABSTRACT Ecological restrictions of the subterranean environment have resulted in sensory adaptations in its inhabitants that limit communication below ground. Adaptations such as degenerate visionExpand
Acoustic Communication in Subterranean Rodents
TLDR
The dark and monotonous subterranean environment limits the transmission of most signals and cues, so the characteristics of the vocal signals usually demonstrate the kind, intensity and process of natural selection. Expand
Vocalizations of the giant mole-rat (Fukomys mechowii), a subterranean rodent with the richest vocal repertoire
TLDR
This study describes the vocal repertoire of the social subterranean rodent, the giant mole-rat (Fukomys mechowii, Bathyergidae), from mesic Afrotropics and suggests that the rich vocal repertoire is connected with rich social interactions in giant Mole-rat families. Expand
Auditory-vocal coupling in the naked mole-rat, a mammal with poor auditory thresholds
TLDR
Despite this species’ poor hearing sensitivity, the naked mole-rat displays a functional, coupled auditory-vocal communication system—a hallmark principle of acoustic communication systems across taxa. Expand
Environmental influences in the evolution of tetrapod hearing sensitivity and middle ear tuning.
TLDR
The comparative approach has revealed a number of generalities about the effect of environmental factors on hearing performance and middle ear structure across species, and the current taxonomic sampling of the major tetrapod groups is still highly unbalanced and incomplete. Expand
Sound transmission and burrow characteristics of the subterranean rodentCtenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae)
TLDR
C. talarum’s territorial vocalization seems to be adequate for long, inter-burrow communication, since its physical characteristics are concomitant with the frequencies that are better transmitted in the natural habitat of this species of subterranean rodent. Expand
Additional row of outer hair cells — The unique pattern of the Corti organ in a subterranean rodent, the Gansu zokor (Eospalax cansus)
TLDR
The Gansu zokor profiles to an interesting candidate for hearing research which might provide further insight not only into morpho-functional adaptations in subterranean mammals in particular but also in the function of outer hair cells in general. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 29 REFERENCES
Hearing in coruros (Spalacopus cyanus): special audiogram features of a subterranean rodent
TLDR
Learning curves and behavioural audiograms of subterranean, socially living coruros were obtained using a positive reinforcement conditioning procedure and revealed best hearing at frequencies between 1.25 and 1.6 kHz, which corresponds with the common pattern established in subterranean rodents studied so far. Expand
Degenerate hearing and sound localization in naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber), with an overview of central auditory structures
TLDR
The fact that subterranean mammals have little use for vision in a lightless environment suggests that naked mole rats represent an extreme case in this relationship and may explain the fact that, unlike surface‐dwelling mammals, they have virtually lost the ability to localize brief sounds. Expand
Hearing in blind subterranean Zambian mole-rats (Cryptomys sp.): collective behavioural audiogram in a highly social rodent
TLDR
The behavioural audiogram of Cryptomys is in many aspects comparable with the available audiograms of other subterranean rodents and differs from neurophysiological data as far as the high frequency cutoff is concerned. Expand
Acoustic communication underground: vocalization characteristics in subterranean social mole-rats (Cryptomys sp., Bathyergidae)
TLDR
In captive adult Zambian mole-rats 14 different sounds have been recorded during different behavioural contexts, the sound analysis revealed that all sounds occurred in a low and middle frequency range with main energy below 10 kHz. Expand
Acoustic communication and burrow acoustics are reflected in the ear morphology of the coruro (Spalacopus cyanus, Octodontidae), a social fossorial rodent
TLDR
The morphology of the ear of the coruro corresponds to the typical pattern seen in subterranean rodents (low frequency and low‐sensitivity hearers), yet, at the same time, it also deviates from it in several functionally relevant features. Expand
Adaptive optimal sound for vocal communication in tunnels of a subterranean mammal (Spalax ehrenbergi)
TLDR
Evidence that sound propagation proved efficient only across short distances (a few meters) is presented, demonstrating the operation of natural selection for adaptive vocal communication in the underground tunnel ecotope. Expand
Hearing and sound localization in blind mole rats (Spalax ehrenbergi)
TLDR
Two blind mole rats were tested for their ability to detect and localize sound and it appears that an exclusive adaptation to a subterranean lifestyle can result in vestigial auditory abilities just as the absence of light results in vestigious vision. Expand
Middle ear and cochlear receptors in the subterranean mole-rat, Spalax ehrenbergi
The eardrum and the auditory ossicles of the middle ear, and the population of cochlear receptors in subterranean mole-rats of Spalax ehrenbergi complex were qualitatively and quantitativelyExpand
The Specialized Auditory System of Kangaroo Rats
TLDR
The specialized auditory system of kangaroo rats describes the combination of their enlarged middle ears, delicately balanced tympano-ossicular system, and cochlear modifications that adapt them for better low-frequency hearing than almost any other very small mammal. Expand
Acoustic distortion products from the cochlea of the blind African mole rat, Cryptomys spec.
TLDR
This finding emphasizes that the presence of frequency expansion does not necessarily lead to enhanced mechanical tuning in the cochlea and one has to consider if in certain bat species with cochlear frequency expansion and particularly sharp cochLear tuning, the two phenomena may not be interlinked. Expand
...
1
2
3
...