Living high-training low increases hypoxic ventilatory response of well-trained endurance athletes.

@article{Townsend2002LivingHL,
  title={Living high-training low increases hypoxic ventilatory response of well-trained endurance athletes.},
  author={N E Townsend and Christopher John Gore and Allan G. Hahn and Michael J McKenna and Robert James Aughey and Sally Ann Clark and Tahnee A. Kinsman and John Alan Hawley and Chang Chow},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={93 4},
  pages={
          1498-505
        }
}
This study determined whether "living high-training low" (LHTL)-simulated altitude exposure increased the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in well-trained endurance athletes. Thirty-three cyclists/triathletes were divided into three groups: 20 consecutive nights of hypoxic exposure (LHTLc, n = 12), 20 nights of intermittent hypoxic exposure (four 5-night blocks of hypoxia, each interspersed with 2 nights of normoxia, LHTLi, n = 10), or control (Con, n = 11). LHTLc and LHTLi slept 8-10 h/day… CONTINUE READING

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