Living donor liver transplantation for congenital absence of the portal vein in a child with cardiac failure.

@article{Sumida2006LivingDL,
  title={Living donor liver transplantation for congenital absence of the portal vein in a child with cardiac failure.},
  author={W. Sumida and K. Kaneko and Y. Ogura and T. Tainaka and Y. Ono and T. Seo and T. Kiuchi and H. Ando},
  journal={Journal of pediatric surgery},
  year={2006},
  volume={41 11},
  pages={
          e9-e12
        }
}
Congenital absence of the portal vein (CAPV) requires liver transplantation when encephalopathy develops. However, transplantation has technical difficulties because no collateral circulation exists except for the portosystemic shunt. Ligating the shunt will cause disastrous mesenteric venous congestion. We report a 19-month-old female infant with CAPV, who had portosystemic encephalopathy and cardiac failure, and underwent living donor liver transplantation with a partial clamp technique using… Expand
Living donor liver transplantation for congenital absence of the portal vein.
TLDR
This work has successfully reconstructed the PV in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a venous interposition graft, which was anastomosed end-to-side to the portocaval shunt by a partial side-clamp, using a patent round ligament of the liver to preserve both the portal and caval blood flows. Expand
Living donor liver transplantation in a pediatric patient with congenital absence of the portal vein
  • J. Namgoong, Shin Hwang, Gil-Chun Park, Hyunhee Kwon, Kyung Mo Kim, Seak Hee Oh
  • Medicine
  • Annals of hepato-biliary-pancreatic surgery
  • 2021
Congenital absence of the portal vein (CAPV) is a rare venous malformation in which mesenteric venous blood drains directly into the systemic circulation. We report a case of pediatric living donorExpand
Living donor liver transplantation for congenital absence of portal vein in portal venous reconstruction with a great saphenous vein graft
TLDR
Using the patient’s own GSV for PV reconstruction during living donor transplantation in the patient with CAPV seems to be an effective method. Expand
Successful living donor liver transplant in a child with Abernethy malformation with biliary atresia, ventricular septal defect and intrapulmonary shunting
TLDR
A report of a rare case of LDLT in a four‐yr old male child suffering with biliary atresia associated with a large congenital CEPSh and intrapulmonary shunts, which regressed within three months after transplantation. Expand
Liver transplantation in an adult with adenomatosis and congenital absence of the portal vein: a case report.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that transplantation is a challenging but technically viable option for treatment of HCC complicating adenomatosis-associated CAPV. Expand
The Role of Liver Transplantation for Congenital Extrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt
TLDR
LT for CEPS showed an excellent outcome and the development of pulmonary complications is an early indication for LT, and precise planning of portal vein reconstruction is required before LT. Expand
Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Unresectable Liver Adenomatosis Associated with Congenital Absence of Portal Vein: A Case Report and Literature Review
TLDR
It is considered that living donor liver transplantation is the best therapeutic solution for AM associated with unresectable liver adenomatosis, especially because compared to receiving a whole liver graft, the waiting time on the liver transplants list is much shorter. Expand
Congenital absence of the portal vein in a middle-aged man
TLDR
A case of a congenital absence of the portal vein, accidentally discovered in a 59-year-old man, completely asymptomatic and not associated with other malformations or biochemical disorders is reported. Expand
Congenital absence of the portal vein—Case report and a review of literature
TLDR
In this case, abdominal venous blood drained into the suprarenal inferior vena cava via the left renal vein and dilated left gastric veins, and the radiological findings of CAPV were illustrated. Expand
Orthotopic Liver Transplantation for Hepatic Adenoma in a Patient with Portal Vein Agenesis
TLDR
A 25-year-old Caucasian female with a complicated medical history including idiopathic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, Sweet's syndrome, acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, who incidentally was diagnosed with multiple liver nodules, the largest 14 cm in diameter, arising at the junction of the left and right hepatic lobes is reported. Expand
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