Living by the Sword and Dying by the Sword? Leadership Transitions in and out of Dictatorships

@article{Debs2016LivingBT,
  title={Living by the Sword and Dying by the Sword? Leadership Transitions in and out of Dictatorships},
  author={Alexandre Debs},
  journal={International Studies Quarterly},
  year={2016},
  volume={60},
  pages={73-84}
}
  • A. Debs
  • Published 1 March 2016
  • Political Science
  • International Studies Quarterly
What makes certain dictatorships more likely than others to democratize? I argue that military dictators , as specialists in violence, often remain threats to their successors. However, when democratic systems replace military dictatorships, that expertise presents less danger to new incumbents. Because democracies select leaders through elections, they reduce the importance of military expertise—and the role of associated violence—in contests for office. Thus, military dictatorships should… 

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