Living after Offa: Place-Names and Social Memory in the Welsh Marches

@inproceedings{Williams2020LivingAO,
  title={Living after Offa: Place-Names and Social Memory in the Welsh Marches},
  author={Howard Williams},
  year={2020}
}
How are linear monuments perceived in the contemporary landscape and how do they operate as memoryscapes for today’s borderland communities? When considering Offa’s Dyke and Wat’s Dyke in today’s world, we must take into account the generations who have long lived in these monuments’ shadows and interacted with them. Even if perhaps only being dimly aware of their presence and stories, these are communities living ‘after Offa’. These monuments have been either neglected or ignored within… 

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Interpreting Wat’s Dyke in the 21st Century

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  • Sociology
    Public Archaeologies of Frontiers and Borderlands
  • 2020
Linear monuments offer special challenges in the context of the public archaeology of frontiers and borderlands. This chapter tackles the interpretive neglect of Britain’s second-longest early

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