Lives without imagery – Congenital aphantasia

@article{Zeman2015LivesWI,
  title={Lives without imagery – Congenital aphantasia},
  author={Adam Zeman and Michaela Dewar and Sergio Della Sala},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2015},
  volume={73},
  pages={378-380}
}
This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Cortex. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published at doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2015.05.019. 
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