Liver failure in a dog following suspected ingestion of blue-green algae (Microcystis spp.): a case report and review of the toxin.

@article{Sebbag2013LiverFI,
  title={Liver failure in a dog following suspected ingestion of blue-green algae (Microcystis spp.): a case report and review of the toxin.},
  author={L. Sebbag and N. Smee and D. van der Merwe and D. Schmid},
  journal={Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association},
  year={2013},
  volume={49 5},
  pages={
          342-6
        }
}
A 2.5 yr old spayed female Weimaraner presented after ingestion of blue-green algae (Microcystis spp.). One day prior to presentation, the patient was swimming at a local lake known to be contaminated with high levels of blue-green algae that was responsible for deaths of several other dogs the same summer. The patient presented 24 hr after exposure with vomiting, inappetence, weakness, and lethargy. Blood work at the time of admission was consistent with acute hepatic failure, characteristic… Expand
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