Live fast, die young: flexibility of life history traits in the fat-tailed dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius)

@article{Lahann2010LiveFD,
  title={Live fast, die young: flexibility of life history traits in the fat-tailed dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius)},
  author={Petra Lahann and Kathrin H. Dausmann},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2010},
  volume={65},
  pages={381-390}
}
The fat-tailed dwarf lemur, Cheirogaleus medius, occurs in ecologically very different habitat types (rainforest and dry forest) across Madagascar. Its extraordinary biological characteristics, such as monogamy and long-term hibernation, allow us to investigate behavioral, ecological, and physiological flexibility of this species in populations across different ecological environments. This study aims to determine whether different life history and physiological traits show variation in… Expand

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