Little history of CAPTCHA

@article{Justie2020LittleHO,
  title={Little history of CAPTCHA},
  author={Brian Justie},
  journal={Internet Histories},
  year={2020},
  volume={5},
  pages={30 - 47}
}
  • B. Justie
  • Published 2 November 2020
  • Computer Science
  • Internet Histories
Abstract This article traces the early history of CAPTCHA, the now ubiquitous cybersecurity tool that prompts users to “confirm their humanity” by solving word- and image-based puzzles before accessing free online services. CAPTCHA, and its many derivatives, are presented as content identification mechanisms: the user is asked to identify content in order for the computer to determine the identity of the user. This twofold process of content identification, however, has evolved significantly… Expand

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