Little Albert: A neurologically impaired child.

@article{Fridlund2012LittleAA,
  title={Little Albert: A neurologically impaired child.},
  author={A. Fridlund and H. P. Beck and W. Goldie and G. Irons},
  journal={History of psychology},
  year={2012},
  volume={15 4},
  pages={
          302-27
        }
}
  • A. Fridlund, H. P. Beck, +1 author G. Irons
  • Published 2012
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • History of psychology
  • Evidence collected by Beck, Levinson, and Irons (2009) indicates that Albert B., the "lost" infant subject of John B. Watson and Rosalie Rayner's (1920) famous conditioning study, was Douglas Merritte (1919-1925). Following the finding that Merritte died early with hydrocephalus, questions arose as to whether Douglas's condition was congenital, rather than acquired in 1922, as cited on his death certificate. This etiology would imply that "Little Albert" was not the "healthy" and "normal… CONTINUE READING
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