Liquorice and its health implications

@article{Olukoga2000LiquoriceAI,
  title={Liquorice and its health implications},
  author={Adebayo Olukoga and David Donaldson},
  journal={The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health},
  year={2000},
  volume={120},
  pages={83 - 89}
}
  • A. Olukoga, D. Donaldson
  • Published 1 June 2000
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health
This article presents an overview of the health implications of liquorice. Liquorice has beneficial applications in the medicinal and the confectionery sectors; the substance, therefore, is both widely available and commercially attractive. However, the ingestion of liquorice, and/or its active metabolites, can sometimes produce an acquired form of appar ent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) syndrome, expressed as sodium retention, potassium loss and suppression of the renin-angiotensin… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
Licorice and its derivatives may protect against carcinogen-induced DNA damage and may be suppressive agents as well, and a rationale is suggested for combinations of agents in preventive clinical trials.
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