Lipopolysaccharide activates an innate immune system response in human adipose tissue in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

@article{Creely2007LipopolysaccharideAA,
  title={Lipopolysaccharide activates an innate immune system response in human adipose tissue in obesity and type 2 diabetes.},
  author={Steven J. Creely and Philip G McTernan and C. M. Kusminski and Ffolliott Martin Fisher and Nancy Fernandes da Silva and Manish Khanolkar and Marc Evans and Alison L. Harte and S. Kumar},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism},
  year={2007},
  volume={292 3},
  pages={
          E740-7
        }
}
  • S. Creely, P. McTernan, S. Kumar
  • Published 1 March 2007
  • Medicine, Biology
  • American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism
UNLABELLED Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Adipose tissue (AT) may represent an important site of inflammation. 3T3-L1 studies have demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates toll-like receptors (TLRs) to cause inflammation. For this study, we 1) examined activation of TLRs and adipocytokines by LPS in human abdominal subcutaneous (AbdSc) adipocytes, 2) examined blockade of NF-kappaB in human AbdSc adipocytes, 3) examined the innate immune… 

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