Lipid-soluble components in cigarette smoke induce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in lung epithelial cells.

@article{Toorn2009LipidsolubleCI,
  title={Lipid-soluble components in cigarette smoke induce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in lung epithelial cells.},
  author={Marco van der Toorn and Delaram Rezayat and Henk F. Kauffman and Stephan J L Bakker and Rijk O. B. Gans and Gerard H. Ko{\"e}ter and Augustine M. K. Choi and Antoon J. M. van Oosterhout and Dirk-Jan Slebos},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={297 1},
  pages={L109-14}
}
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in cigarette smoke (CS) are thought to contribute to the development of COPD. Although CS-ROS can hardly enter airway epithelial cells, and certainly not the circulation, systemic levels of ROS have been found to be elevated in COPD patients. We hypothesize that lipophilic components present in CS can enter airway epithelial cells and increase intracellular ROS production by disturbing mitochondrial function. Different airway epithelial cells were exposed… CONTINUE READING