Lion's mane jellyfish sting

@article{Mahon2020LionsMJ,
  title={Lion's mane jellyfish sting},
  author={Andrew Mahon and Tom Edward Mallinson},
  journal={Journal of Paramedic Practice},
  year={2020},
  volume={10},
  pages={46-48}
}
The authors present the case of an Irukandji-like syndrome resulting from cnidarian envenomation, following multiple stings from the lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata) encountered by a sea swimmer in the coastal waters of the UK. This case presents the initial features of Irukandji-like syndrome in this 45-year-old female, her management in the emergency department and subsequent discharge. Envenomation from the lion's mane species and the Irukandji syndrome are briefly discussed. 

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