Linking global warming to amphibian declines through its effects on female body condition and survivorship

@article{Reading2006LinkingGW,
  title={Linking global warming to amphibian declines through its effects on female body condition and survivorship},
  author={Christopher J Reading},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2006},
  volume={151},
  pages={125-131}
}
  • C. Reading
  • Published 5 January 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Oecologia
There is general consensus that climate change has contributed to the observed decline, and extinction, of many amphibian species throughout the world. However, the mechanisms of its effects remain unclear. A laboratory study in 1980–1981 in which temperate zone amphibians that were prevented from hibernating had decreased growth rates, matured at a smaller size and had increased mortality compared with those that hibernated suggested one possible mechanism. I used data from a field study of… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Decreased winter severity increases viability of a montane frog population
TLDR
A warming climate with less severe winters is likely to promote population viability in this montane frog population and amphibians and other ectotherms inhabiting alpine or boreal habitats at or near their thermal ecological limits may benefit from the milder winters provided by a warming climate.
Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians
TLDR
It is found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation, and the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hiberration.
Amphibian Declines Are Not Uniquely High amongst the Vertebrates: Trend Determination and the British Perspective
TLDR
Comparison evidence for British amphibians and reptiles concerning historical abundance, population trends and their causes are summarized, and how they relate to the situation elsewhere in Europe (and possibly the World).
Amphibian Conservation in Britain: A 40-Year History
TLDR
In the past 4 decades conservation efforts have stabilized, although not increased, the U.K. calamita population, but some of the widespread species are still declining, albeit at a slower rate than in the postwar period.
Review and synthesis of the effects of climate change on amphibians.
TLDR
It is recommended that amphibian-climate research shift from primarily inductive, correlational approach as to studies that evaluate alternative hypotheses for declines, and additional rigor will require interdisciplinary collaborations, estimates of costs and benefits of climate change to amphibian fitness and populations, and the integration of correlative field studies, experiments on 'model' amphibian species, and mathematical and functional, physiological models.
Effect of climatic conditions on post-hibernation body condition and reproductive traits of Bufo bufo females
TLDR
R e a d i n g (2007) demonstrated clear relationship between increase in mean temperature, body condition decline, and decrease in fecundity.
Long-Term Trends toward Earlier Breeding of Japanese Amphibians
TLDR
This investigation demonstrated that climate warming has affected the timing of breeding in at least some species or populations of amphibians in East Asia.
Life history variation along an elevational gradient in Plethodon montanus: implications for conservation
TLDR
The life history variation of Plethodon montanus is described using capture-recapture data over a period of four years, at five sites along an elevational gradient and how vital rates vary with body size, elevation, sex, and season is determined.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
The amphibian decline crisis: A watershed for conservation biology?
Complex causes of amphibian population declines
TLDR
Climate-induced reductions in water depth at oviposition sites have caused high mortality of embryos by increasing their exposure to UV-B radiation and, consequently, their vulnerability to infection, indicating the role of large-scale climatic patterns involving the tropical Pacific.
Climate change and amphibian declines: is there a link?
Abstract. Global climates have been changing, sometimes rapidly and dramatically, throughout the evolutionary history of amphibians. Therefore, existing amphibian species have been derived from those
What Is Missing in Amphibian Decline Research: Insights from Ecological Sensitivity Analysis
TLDR
Two types of ecological sensitivity analysis were used to determine which vital rates have the strongest influence on the population dynamics of western toads, red-legged frogs, and common frogs that have declined in all or portions of their ranges.
Complex life cycles and density dependence: assessing the contribution of egg mortality to amphibian declines
TLDR
A demographic model for two amphibians with contrasting life-history strategies, Bufo boreas and Ambystoma macrodactylum is developed and it is revealed that larval density dependence can dramatically alter the consequences of early mortality, reducing or even reversing the expected population-level effects of egg mortality.
Quantitative evidence for global amphibian population declines
TLDR
It is suggested that while large-scale trends show considerable geographical and temporal variability, amphibian populations are in fact declining—and that this decline has been happening for several decades.
DECLINING DOWNWIND: AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN CALIFORNIA AND HISTORICAL PESTICIDE USE
Pesticides have long been proposed as a possible cause of amphibian pop- ulation declines, but due to a number of challenges there has been relatively little ecotox- icological research on pesticides
Global amphibian declines: sorting the hypotheses
TLDR
More studies are needed to connect the suspected mechanisms underlying both classes of hypotheses with quantitative changes in amphibian population sizes and species numbers, and to identify the hypotheses and conditions under which the various causes operate alone or together.
Amphibian Declines: Judging Stability, Persistence, and Susceptibility of Populations to Local and Global Extinctions
TLDR
It is suggested that many amphibian populations may be unable to recolonize areas after local extinction, due to the physiological constraints, relatively low mobility, and site fidelity of amphibians.
Decline of a Tropical Montane Amphibian Fauna
TLDR
It is concluded that environmental contamination (biotic pathogens or chemicals) or a combina- tion of factors (environmental contamination plus climate change) may be responsible for declines in the amphibian populations at this protected site.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...