Linguistic Relativity in Japanese and English: Is Language the Primary Determinant in Object Classification?

@article{Mazuka2000LinguisticRI,
  title={Linguistic Relativity in Japanese and English: Is Language the Primary Determinant in Object Classification?},
  author={Reiko Mazuka and Ronald Seth Friedman},
  journal={Journal of East Asian Linguistics},
  year={2000},
  volume={9},
  pages={353-377}
}
In the present study, we tested claims by Lucy (1992a, 1992b) that differences between the number marking systems used by Yucatec Maya and English lead speakers of these languages to differentially attend to either the material composition or the shape of objects. In order to evaluate Lucy's hypothesis, we replicated his critical object classification experiment using speakers of English and Japanese, a language with a number marking system very similar to that employed by Yucatec Maya. Our… Expand
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