Linear and nonlinear hearing aid fittings – 1. Patterns of benefit

@article{Gatehouse2006LinearAN,
  title={Linear and nonlinear hearing aid fittings – 1. Patterns of benefit},
  author={Stuart Gatehouse and Graham Naylor and Claus Elberling},
  journal={International Journal of Audiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={45},
  pages={130 - 152}
}
We evaluated the benefits of fast-acting WDRC, slow-acting AVC, and linear reference fittings for speech intelligibility and reported disability, in a within-subject within-device masked crossover design on 50 listeners with SNHL. Five hearing aid fittings were implemented having two compression channels and seven frequency bands. Each listener sequentially experienced each fitting for a 10-week period. Outcome measures included speech intelligibility under diverse conditions and self-reported… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Results for the DLFs, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, provided some support for the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS, which was tested using a simulated hearing aid. Expand
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Candidature dimensions include HTLs, ULLs, spectro-temporal and masking abnormalities, cognitive capacity, and self-reports and acoustic measures of auditory ecology, which include measures beyond auditory function in the domains of cognitive capacity and auditory ecology. Expand
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