Lineage selection and the evolution of multistage carcinogenesis

@article{Nunney1999LineageSA,
  title={Lineage selection and the evolution of multistage carcinogenesis},
  author={Leonard Nunney},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1999},
  volume={266},
  pages={493 - 498}
}
  • L. Nunney
  • Published 7 March 1999
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
A wide array of proto–oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes are involved in the prevention of cancer. Each form of cancer requires mutations in a characteristic group of genes, but no single group controls all cancers. This lack of generality shows that the control of cancer is not an ancient, fixed property of cells. By contrast, it supports a dynamic evolutionary model, whereby genetic controls over unregulated cell growth are recruited independently through evolutionary time in different… 

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