Limits of Electoral Predictions Using Twitter

@inproceedings{GayoAvello2011LimitsOE,
  title={Limits of Electoral Predictions Using Twitter},
  author={Daniel Gayo-Avello and Panagiotis Takis Metaxas and Eni Mustafaraj},
  booktitle={ICWSM},
  year={2011}
}
Using social media for political discourse is becoming common practice, especially around election time. One interesting aspect of this trend is the possibility of pulsing the public’s opinion about the elections, and that has attracted the interest of many researchers and the press. Allegedly, predicting electoral outcomes from social media data can be feasible and even simple. Positive results have been reported, but without an analysis on what principle enables them. Our work puts to test… CONTINUE READING

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