Limiting gravity waves in water of finite depth

@article{Williams1981LimitingGW,
  title={Limiting gravity waves in water of finite depth},
  author={Jonathan M. Williams},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences},
  year={1981},
  volume={302},
  pages={139 - 188}
}
  • J. Williams
  • Published 8 August 1981
  • Physics
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Progressive, irrotational gravity waves of constant form exist as a two-parameter family. The first parameter, the ratio of mean depth to wavelength, varies from zero (the solitary wave) to infinity (the deep-water wave). The second parameter, the wave height or amplitude, varies from zero (the infinitesimal wave) to a limiting value dependent on the first parameter. For limiting waves the wave crest ceases to be rounded and becomes angled, with an included angle of 120°. Most methods of… 

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