Limited spread of innovation in a wild parrot, the kea (Nestor notabilis)

@article{Gajdon2006LimitedSO,
  title={Limited spread of innovation in a wild parrot, the kea (Nestor notabilis)},
  author={Gyula Koppany Gajdon and Natasha Fijn and Ludwig Huber},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2006},
  volume={9},
  pages={173-181}
}
In the local population of kea in Mount Cook Village, New Zealand, some keas open the lids of rubbish bins with their bill to obtain food scraps within. We investigated the extent to which this innovation has spread in the local population, and what factors limit the acquisition of bin opening. Only five males of 36 individually recognised birds were observed to have performed successful bin opening. With one exception there were always other keas present, watching successful bin opening… 
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