Limited Proliferation-Resistance Benefits from Recycling Unseparated Transuranics and Lanthanides from Light-Water Reactor Spent Fuel

@article{Kang2005LimitedPB,
  title={Limited Proliferation-Resistance Benefits from Recycling Unseparated Transuranics and Lanthanides from Light-Water Reactor Spent Fuel},
  author={Jungmin Kang and Frank von Hippel},
  journal={Science \& Global Security},
  year={2005},
  volume={13},
  pages={169 - 181}
}
Keeping LWR plutonium mixed with other transuranics and with lanthanide fission products other than 154Eu does not make it significantly more self protecting or more difficult to fabricate into a nuclear weapon. Gamma-ray and neutron doses at one meter, heat generation, and spontaneous-neutron emission are calculated from 1-kg metal balls of weapon-grade plutonium, reactor-grade plutonium, and the full mix of transuranics in high-burnup light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel with and without the… Expand
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