Limitations of recreational camera traps for wildlife management and conservation research: A practitioner’s perspective

@inproceedings{Newey2015LimitationsOR,
  title={Limitations of recreational camera traps for wildlife management and conservation research: A practitioner’s perspective},
  author={Scott Newey and Paul J. Davidson and Sajid Nazir and Gorry Fairhurst and Fabio Verdicchio and R Justin Irvine and Ren{\'e} van der Wal},
  booktitle={Ambio},
  year={2015}
}
The availability of affordable ‘recreational’ camera traps has dramatically increased over the last decade. We present survey results which show that many conservation practitioners use cheaper ‘recreational’ units for research rather than more expensive ‘professional’ equipment. We present our perspective of using two popular models of ‘recreational’ camera trap for ecological field-based studies. The models used (for >2 years) presented us with a range of practical problems at all stages of… CONTINUE READING
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