Limitations in attending to a feature value for overriding stimulus-driven interference

@article{Kumada1999LimitationsIA,
  title={Limitations in attending to a feature value for overriding stimulus-driven interference},
  author={Takatsune Kumada},
  journal={Perception \& Psychophysics},
  year={1999},
  volume={61},
  pages={61-79}
}
  • T. Kumada
  • Published 1999
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perception & Psychophysics
Six experiments were conducted to examine the effect of knowledge of a target for overriding stimulus-driven interference in simple search tasks (Experiments 1–3) and compound search tasks (Experiments 4–6). In simple search when the target differed from nontargets in orientation, a singleton distractor that had an orientation equivalent to that of a target interfered with search for the target. When the singleton distractor was less salient than the target with respect to the target-defining… 
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