Light intensity, salinity, and host velocity influence presettlement intensity and distribution on hosts by copepodids of sea lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis

@article{Genna2005LightIS,
  title={Light intensity, salinity, and host velocity influence presettlement intensity and distribution on hosts by copepodids of sea lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis},
  author={R. L. Genna and William Mordue and Alan W. Pike and Anne Jennifer Mordue},
  journal={Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={62},
  pages={2675-2682}
}
Intensity and distribution of presettlement by the copepodid of the sea louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, on smolts of its host Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, were quantified for 27 infection regimes under controlled flume conditions. Each infection regime represented a level of interaction between three levels (low, medium, high) of the physical factors of light (10, 300, 800 lx), salinity (20‰, 27‰, 35‰), and host velocity (0.2, 7.0, 15.0 cm·s–1). Light, salinity, and host velocity independently… 

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