Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder with Blue Narrow-Band Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

@article{Glickman2006LightTF,
  title={Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder with Blue Narrow-Band Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)},
  author={Gena L. Glickman and Brenda Byrne and Carissa C Pineda and Walter W. Hauck and George C. Brainard},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2006},
  volume={59},
  pages={502-507}
}

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