Light Production by the Arm Tips of the Deep-Sea Cephalopod Vampyroteuthis infernalis

@article{Robison2003LightPB,
  title={Light Production by the Arm Tips of the Deep-Sea Cephalopod Vampyroteuthis infernalis},
  author={Bruce H Robison and Kim R. Reisenbichler and James C. Hunt and Steven H. D. Haddock},
  journal={The Biological Bulletin},
  year={2003},
  volume={205},
  pages={102 - 109}
}
The archaic, deep-sea cephalopod Vampyroteuthis infernalis occurs in dark, oxygen-poor waters below 600 m off Monterey Bay, California. Living specimens, collected gently with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and quickly transported to a laboratory ashore, have revealed two hitherto undescribed means of bioluminescent expression for the species. In the first, light is produced by a new type of organ located at the tips of all eight arms. In the second, a viscous fluid containing microscopic… Expand
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