Light Flashes Observed by Astronauts on Apollo 11 through Apollo 17

@article{Pinsky1974LightFO,
  title={Light Flashes Observed by Astronauts on Apollo 11 through Apollo 17},
  author={Lawrence S. Pinsky and W. Z. Osborne and J. Vernon Bailey and R. E. Benson and Lewis F. Thompson},
  journal={Science},
  year={1974},
  volume={183},
  pages={957 - 959}
}
The crew members on the last seven Apollo flights observed light flashes that are tentatively attributed to cosmic ray nuclei (atomic number ≥ 6) penetrating the head and eyes of the observers. Analyses of the event rates for all missions has revealed an anomalously low rate for transearth coast observations with respect to translunar coast observations. 

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Pinsky, in Apollo 16 Preliminary Science Report (NASA SP-315
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration,
  • 1972
We thank E. Anders for discussions and P