Lifetime prevalence of schizophrenia among individuals prenatally exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki City

@article{Imamura1999LifetimePO,
  title={Lifetime prevalence of schizophrenia among individuals prenatally exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki City},
  author={Yukiko Imamura and Y. Nakane and Yasuyuki Ohta and Hisayoshi Kondo},
  journal={Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica},
  year={1999},
  volume={100}
}
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between prenatal exposure to atomic bomb (A‐bomb) radiation and the development of schizophrenia in adulthood. 

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