Lifetime cancer prevalence and life history traits in mammals

@article{Boddy2020LifetimeCP,
  title={Lifetime cancer prevalence and life history traits in mammals},
  author={Amy M. Boddy and Lisa M. Abegglen and Allan Pessier and Athena Aktipis and Joshua D. Schiffman and Carlo C. Maley and Carmel Witte},
  journal={Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health},
  year={2020},
  volume={2020},
  pages={187 - 195}
}
Abstract Background Cancer is a common diagnosis in many mammalian species, yet they vary in their vulnerability to cancer. The factors driving this variation are unknown, but life history theory offers potential explanations to why cancer defense mechanisms are not equal across species. Methodology Here we report the prevalence of neoplasia and malignancy in 37 mammalian species, representing 11 mammalian orders, using 42 years of well curated necropsy data from the San Diego Zoo and San Diego… 

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