Life with 6000 Genes

@article{Goffeau1996LifeW6,
  title={Life with 6000 Genes},
  author={Andr{\'e} Goffeau and Bart Barrell and Howard Bussey and R W Davis and Bernard Dujon and Horst Feldmann and Francis Galibert and J{\"o}rg D. Hoheisel and Claude Jacq and Mark Johnston and Edward J Louis and Hans-Werner Mewes and Yoko Murakami and Peter Philippsen and Herv{\'e} Tettelin and Stephen G. Oliver},
  journal={Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={274},
  pages={546 - 567}
}
The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completely sequenced through a worldwide collaboration. The sequence of 12,068 kilobases defines 5885 potential protein-encoding genes, approximately 140 genes specifying ribosomal RNA, 40 genes for small nuclear RNA molecules, and 275 transfer RNA genes. In addition, the complete sequence provides information about the higher order organization of yeast's 16 chromosomes and allows some insight into their evolutionary history. The genome… 
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Pseudogenes in yeast?
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